Field Trip: [Im]material Nuclear Landscapes

Sam NightingaleEvents

image of Dounreay nuclear power station

Excited to be leading the field trip [Im]material Nuclear Landscapes for TimeSpan, and speaking about my research at their two-day conference Practicing Deep Time. 

The field trip is part of the Practicing Deep Time conference taking place at Timespan and in the surrounding environments of East Sutherland and Caithness on 23 + 24 March 2018. For more details and information on how to book please visit the Practicing Deep Time page.

In this field trip led by artist Sam Nightingale, we travel to Caithness – the furthest reaches of mainland Scotland – to ask how we might imagine deep time through the material and immaterial nuclear landscape? That is, through a deep time that stretches into the future as much as it finds its inheritance in the far reaches of the past. We will explore the ‘[Im]material Nuclear Landscape’; through a range of discursive activities that put into tension the concrete infrastructure that supports nuclear energy projects (and their decommissioning) and the seemingly invisible radiological traces that remain deep into the future. Read More

Exhibition: Salon 17: New Approaches in Photography

Sam NightingaleExhibition

A Crystalline World (2017) & Big Salt (NaCI) (2017)
Four Corners Gallery, London
17 – 28 October 2017

A Crystalline World (2017) is a series of photographic salt prints made using salt collected from a disused salt mine in the Mallee, a semi-arid region of Victoria, Australia. The images show the creases of time that have been etched into the abandoned salt stacks left over from when salt was harvested from a nearby salt lake. The work engages with the “deep-time” of the Mallee, a region that was transformed from an ancient inland sea to a semi-arid terrain over a period of thousands of years, by chemically enfolding elements from the environment into the image-making process of the salt print. This process therefore maps the shifting ecologies of the site through its own materials, the salt being both the subject and the material means through which the image is printed (and becomes visible). Displayed alongside is Big Salt (NaCI) (2017): two c-type prints that reproduce the sculptural forms of the salt that Nightingale used to make the salt prints.Read More

EXHIBITION: SPECTRAL ECOLOGIES

Sam NightingaleExhibition

Sam Nightingale, 2016

Spectral Ecologies
Artists: Sam Nightingale and Polly Stanton
April to 18 June 2017
Mildura Arts Centre, Australia

Spectral Ecologies is an exhibition of photography, sound and video that explores the landscape of the Mallee through the idea of the “cinematic”, asking how does cinema create a particular way of seeing? The artists, Sam Nightingale and Polly Stanton, take up this question by exploring the different ways that technologies enable us to see and to experience the landscape of the Mallee, the way specific narratives frame what we see, and the way that the land creates its own images. Working through the tracks and traces of the route taken by an early traveling picture show and responding to the inherent image-making capacity of the landscape, Nightingale and Stanton creatively map and imagine the Mallee…Read More